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Posts Tagged ‘bib’

My tiniest clone is just about seven months old and still hasn’t popped a tooth yet.  She’s been drooling at a rate of about 3 gallons per hour though, so I think she’s getting close.  Bib changes are pretty frequent around here, and I knew it was time to whip up some new ones when I found myself reaching for a Christmas bib because all other options were in the wash or soaked with drool.

Gather your supplies.  You’ll need:

  • Fabric of choice (a fat quarter will make four bibs)
  • Cotton chenille stripe fabric
  • a glass or other round 3.5″ object
  • velcro
  • a sewing machine

Layer your fabric and chenille, right sides together and cut it to 8×10″.  Be sure when you’re lining it up the the fabric and chenille in the directions that you want them.  I like my chenille stripes to be horizontal, and for this bib, I wanted the fabric stripes to be vertical.  The longer length is the vertical measurement.

Use your glass (mine was my beloved Yuengling lager pint glass) to trace rounded edges at each corner.  Center the glass about 1.75″ down from the top edge and trace a circle.  Trace a line from the middle of the top edge into the circle. 

Now start cutting.  I like to throw a few pins in the layers to keep them from slipping around. 

Once all your cuts are made, it’s time to sew.  I pinned the edges and sewed all around with a 1/4″ seam allowance, making sure to leave about a 2-3″ opening along one side so you can turn your bib inside out.  I used a pencil to get into the corners when I turned it inside out because the top pieces can be a little tricky.

Fold the edges of the opening under and pin in place, then press your bib.  Add the Velcro and top stitch with a narrow seam allowance around the edges.

The great thing about this bib is that you can use the chenille side for very heavy droolers, or the fabric side for the more fashionable baby.  If you want to make several at once, you can layer, trace and cut them all at the same time, just be sure the right sides are together because it makes it easier to line up to sew.

Here’s Miss Ava modeling her new bib.  It took about 4 seconds for her to drool on it.  🙂

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